Clinical Quality Improvement Program

The Clinical Quality Improvement Program (CQIP) is a 10-month course designed to build capability in leading improvement work in health care, with a focus on clinical quality improvement projects. The program includes a mix of theory and experiential learning, along with individual coaching and a community of practice. Saskatchewan's Clinical Quality Improvement Program is a sister program to Intermountain Healthcare’s internationally recognized mini-Advanced Training program that has been adapted for Saskatchewan’s health care system.

Who should participate in CQIP?

CQIP is designed for actively practising health care clinicians in a clinical context or setting from across Saskatchewan, including non-physicians and teams. CQIP is for all care settings — including long-term, community, acute and primary care.

While participants do not require previous quality improvement experience to take this program, some exposure is recommended. CQIP’s focus is on clinical quality improvement, but the knowledge and skills developed through this program can be applied to a diverse range of improvement projects.

cqip cohort 1 poster presentation

CQIP's strong links to Appropriateness of Care

CQIP supports the Appropriateness of Care Program by providing physicians and other clinicians in Saskatchewan with the training required to lead clinical improvement projects, particularly those with clear alignment with health system strategic priorities.

Want more information?

For more information about Saskatchewan's Clinical Quality Improvement Program, please download the application guide and application form.

Past CQIP participant projects

Scroll down to view past participant project presentations and posters. 

How to apply

Please read the application guide and fill out the application form. Applications may be submitted via email to cqip@hqc.sk.ca or printed and mailed to HQC’s main office. Further details regarding application submission can be found in the application package.

Application deadline

The deadline to apply for the next session was June 11th, 2018. If you miss the deadline, you can still apply to be added to the waitlist for the next session.

View Past CQIP Projects

Cohort 1 Participants and Their QI Projects

At the end of the CQIP program, participants present their projects through 3.5-minute long presentations – called QIck Talks – to guests and fellow graduates. The CQIP grads also share more details about their findings on large-format conference-style posters. View past participant project videos and posters below to learn more about the types of clinical quality improvement happening right here at home in Saskatchewan.

Dr. Chantal Ansell, Senior Physician, University of Saskatchewan Student Health Centre

Project: Shared Care for Improved Care

The majority of patients visiting the University of Saskatchewan’s Student Wellness Centre are seeking care for mental health related illnesses. The Student Wellness Centre is a designated primary health care site that includes primary care providers, counsellors, psychiatrists, and a mental health nurse. Dr. Ansell’s project is exploring whether a shared care model reduces the wait time to specialist consultation and if the shared care model results in happier patients and providers. View her poster to find out!

QIck Talk Video

Project Poster


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Dr. Shamsuddin Fakhir, Pediatrician, Saskatchewan Health Authority

Pediatric Clinical Pathways: Reduction of Respiratory Swabs and Chest X-Rays by 50% in the Management of Acute Bronchiolitis in Children

Dr. Fakhir’s team chose acute bronchiolitis in children as the focus of their QI project because there is a lot of variation in how the condition is treated across different hospitals, provinces, and even countries. Dr. Fakhir found physicians in the former Cypress Health Region were not using evidence-based clinical pathways, that there were barriers to pathway use, and a lack of organizational support. The aim of Dr. Fakhir’s project was to reduce chest x-rays and respiratory swabs by 50% by the end of 2017. View his poster to learn more about his project!

QIck Talk Video

Project Poster


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Dr. Milo Fink, Area Lead, Regina, Saskatchewan Health Authority

The Truth about Discharge Summaries: Tertiary Medicine to Community

The focus of Dr. Fink’s CQIP project was on improving transfers and handovers between tertiary care and the community. Safe handovers require timely sharing of concise, reliable information about patients. After reviewing a week’s worth of discharge summaries from internal medicine, Dr. Fink found that while the quality of information was good there are often delays in making that information available. He introduced a number of process improvements aimed at improving timeliness of information sharing. View his poster to learn more about his project!

QIck Talk Video

Project Poster


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Dr. Marcie Heggie, Family Physician and Physician, Yorkton Regional Health Centre

Improving Management of COPD Exacerbations in YRHC ER

Dr. Heggie had the perception that many visits to the Yorkton Regional Health Centre’s ER were by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). COPD is best managed by family physicians in their offices, as through the use of patient tools to help people self manage their condition. The former Sunrise Health Region had the highest smoking rate in the province (28.9% compared to 24.6% in Sask.). YRHC ER faced frequent visits for COPD due to advanced age, comorbidities, current smoking, and a lack of referral to community resources for COPD education and self-management of chronic disease. Dr. Heggie's aim was to increase the referral rate of possible COPD patients from the YRHC ER to a community pulmonary rehabilitation program by 50% by October 2017. View her poster to learn more about her project!

QIck Talk Video

Project Poster


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Dr. Maurice Ogaick, General Surgeon, Saskatoon

Reducing Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Inguinal Hernias

Inguinal hernias are fairly common. Surgeons often receive referrals from family physicians with an ultrasound accompanying it. Typically, inguinal hernias are easy to detect on clinical examination, especially if they are larger ones. Surgeons find that these ultrasounds rarely influence how they treat patients. As a result, reducing these unnecessary ultrasounds could save patients and the health care system time and resources. For his CQIP project, Dr. Ogaick communicated to general practitioners that an ultrasound is not necessary for patients with inguinal hernias that are readily apparent on clinical examination, then looked at the impact this had on the number of ultrasounds accompanying referrals. View his poster to learn more about his project!

QIck Talk Video

Project Poster


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Dr. Shaqil Peermohamed, Infectious Disease Specialist, Saskatoon

Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Use in the ICU

Studies have shown that 30% of antibiotics prescribed in intensive care units (ICUs) are unnecessary or inappropriate. Effective strategies for promoting judicious antimicrobial prescribing in this care setting must take into account the critical conditions of ICU patients and the collaborative approach to care on these units. For his CQIP project, Dr. Peermohamed and a pharmacist met with the ICU team in-person three times per week to discuss all patients actively receiving antibiotics; after these meetings, they provided recommendations to the ICU team. View his poster to learn more about his project!

QIck Talk Video

Project Poster


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Dr. Henrike Rees, Pathologist, Saskatoon

The Development of a Breast Pathology Subspecialty Model: The Saskatoon Experience

Dr. Rees's quality improvement project focused on developing a subspeciality service model for breast pathologists to improve care for breast cancer patients and reduce inefficiencies. Breast cancer pathology reports provide essential information and contribute to the management plan of breast cancer patients. Poor quality, delayed, or incomplete breast cancer reports impact the quality of patient care. In the past, breast cancer cases have been reported by general pathologists in Saskatoon and the quality and turnaround time of these reports has not been monitored. Dr. Rees began to measure and monitor the quality and turnaround time of breast cancer pathology reports. View her poster to learn more about her project!

QIck Talk Video

Project Poster


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Dr. Rabia Shahid, General Internist, Saskatoon

Reducing Unnecessary Testing Before Surgery

While working in the pre-op clinic, Dr. Shahid noticed that unnecessary testing happens on a daily basis. The results of preoperative tests rarely change how patients are managed and in some cases can cause them harm. Dr. Shahid worked with a team of stakeholders, including experts and representatives from different departments, to look at preoperative testing done on patients scheduled for knee and hip surgery. The team found most unnecessary testing occurs because providers are not aware of guidelines and the lack of a standardized tool or protocol for testing. The team's goal was to reduce unnecessary testing before surgery by 50%. View her poster to learn more about her project!

QIck Talk Video

Project Poster


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Dr. Philip Wright, Radiation Oncologist, Saskatoon Cancer Centre

Optimizing Use of Single Fraction Palliative Radiation Therapy for Bone Metastases

Systematic reviews show that a single fraction of radiation of treatment can provide similar results to multiple factions for palliation of painful bone metastases. In Canada, Choosing Wisely Canada released recommendations  in 2014 specifically for radiation oncology on using a single fraction for uncomplicated bone metastases. In 2016, the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC) released a spotlight report on sustainability and quality in cancer control recommending the use of a single fraction of radiation therapy for painful bone metastases. CPAC identified the desire to have a pilot project to identify ways that practitioners can increase the use of a single fraction in jurisdictions, of which Saskatchewan and Manitoba were chosen. Dr. Wright's future plan for his CQIP project is to obtain and discuss survey results, collect real-time data on an ongoing basis, share anonymous results with practitioners, and implement processes to promote single fraction use. View his poster to learn more about his project!

QIck Talk Video

Project Poster


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For more information about the Clinical Quality Improvement Program, please contact

Latest news: Learning programs for health care professionals

External Partners

Dr. Vicki Cattell

CQIP Coach

Saskatoon

Dr. Shamsuddin Fakhir

CQIP Coach

Saskatoon

Dr. Phillip Fourie

CQIP Faculty (Cohort 2)

Yorkton

Dr. Gary Groot

CQIP Faculty (Cohort 1 and 2)

Saskatoon

Dr. Erin Hamilton

CQIP Coach

CQIP Coach

Dr. Cecil Hammond

CQIP Faculty (Cohort 2)

Prince Albert

Dr. Jason Hosain

CQIP Faculty (Cohort 1 and 2)

Saskatoon

Dr. David Kopriva

CQIP Coach

Regina

Dr. Shabir Mia

CQIP Coach

Saskatoon

Dr. Bruce Murray

CQIP Coach

North Battleford

Dr. Rabia Shahid

CQIP Coach

Saskatoon

Dr. Nicolette Sinclair

CQIP Coach

Saskatoon

Dr. Guruswamy Sridhar

CQIP Coach

Regina